Timeline | Before 1800 to After 1930 | PORTUGAL

Date

Country | Theme | Description

1777 - 1810


Drum table in Queen Maria I style 
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Portugal | Fine And Applied Arts

Under Queen Maria I (1734–1816) and King João VI (1767–1826) a new neoclassical decorative grammar replaces the dominant rococo style. Besides French and English influences, the main features of the furniture are the carving of classical inspiration and the inlay work using various woods, creating both geometrical and floral compositions.

1807 - 1816


Prince Regent João (João VI), who transferred the Portuguese court to Brazil 
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Portugal | Political Context

First Napoleonic invasion. Prince Regent João (1767–1826, crowned in 1816) transfers the court and the seat of political power to Brazil, avoiding being deposed and replaced by a Napoleonic nominee as in other European kingdoms. In Portugal, Beresford, the British governor, intervenes in Portuguese general politics disregarding national needs.

1817 - 1821


The Provisional Ruling Council arriving at Praça do Rossio (The Provisional Ruling Team attempted to govern the kingdom during King João VIs absence) 
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Portugal | Political Context

The emergence of liberal ideas. In Porto a Provisional Ruling Council is created (1820) and pursues the rebellion against British rule that started in Lisbon. Liberal revolution breaks out in Porto (August 1820), spreads to Lisbon, beginning the radical cycle known as Vintismo. King João VI is forced to return to Portugal from Brazil in 1821.

1820


Share of the steamship Restaurador Lusitano 
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Portugal | Great Inventions Of The 19th Century

14 October: The steamship Conde de Palmela arrives on the Tagus River. Built in Liverpool by Mottershead and Hays, it was commissioned by the Portuguese consul there. It is said to be the first ship to cross the Biscay, a journey of 1,000 miles, and the first steamship to be seen in Portugal.

1822


Manuel Fernandes Tomás, One of the Principal Organisers of the 1820 Liberal Revolution, Speaking at the First Constituent Assembly 
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Portugal | Political Context

1 October: Inspired by Cadiz Constitution members of Parliament authored the first liberal Constitution. King João VI (1767-1826) promulgated the document on 1 October 1822, in Lisbon. Royal prerogatives and the nobles and clergy privileges were limited, though with a weak impact.

1822


Dom Pedro, Duke of Braganza [1798–1834] 
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Portugal | Political Context

King João VI asks his heir Prince Pedro, Duke of Braganza (1798–1834) to remain in Brazil. Part of the court decides to stay there. Facing revolt against the anti-Brazilian policy of Portugal, Pedro proclaims the independence of Brazil on 7 September (Grito do Ipiranga). In October he is acclaimed as the first Brazilian Emperor, Pedro I.

1822

Portugal | Reforms And Social Changes

1 October: Unavoidable recognition by King João VI of the first liberal Constitution approved by Parliament on 23 September. Inspired by the Spanish Constitution of 1812 and the French ones of 1791, 1793 and 1795, royal prerogatives and the privileges of nobles and clergy are to be limited, though this has only weak impact.

1824

Portugal | Rediscovering The Past

Publication of O Alfageme de Santarém, a drama by Almeida Garret (1799–1854). The subject is the dynastic crisis of 1383–85 when the Portuguese kingdom was invaded by Juan I of Castille, married to the heir to the Portuguese throne, Princess Beatriz. In 1385, acclaimed King João I of Avis with Lady Philippa of Lancaster created the dynasty of Avis, responsible for the era of the Discoveries.

1825

Portugal | Rediscovering The Past

Almeida Garrett writes the poems Camões (1825) and Dona Branca (1826), considered the first romantic works in Portuguese. The hero, Camões, is presented as an outcast who, returning to the motherland, dies in the year when Portugal loses its independence (1580). The fantasy of medieval wizardry traditions is represented in Dona Branca.

1826 - 1832


His Majesty, D. Pedro Restoring his Daughter Princess D. Maria II and the Constitutional Chart to the Portuguese, 1832 
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Portugal | Political Context

With the death of his father, Emperor Pedro I of Brazil becomes Pedro IV of Portugal but gives up the throne to his daughter, future Queen Maria II. The proclamation of a moderate Constitutional Charter does not stop the absolutist movement led by his brother, Prince Miguel (1802–66), who disregards the rights of his niece Princess Maria and Pedro’s decision.
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